Tag Archives: Salmonella

Mathematical Modelling of the Dynamics and Control of Salmonella

The Pig Site – Key findings are outlined from a research project carried out at the University of Liverpool which was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and BPEX, as part of a Collaborative Award in Science and Engineering (CASE) studentship.
The aim of the research was to develop mathematical models to understand the dynamics of Salmonella transmission on finishing pig farms in the UK and assess whether farm structure has any effect on this. The aim was to use these models to investigate where control strategies should be aimed.
Two key forms of unit structure (fully slatted and solid floor) were analysed and three models describing Salmonella transmission were developed:
  • Single room, fully-slatted floor
  • Multiple rooms, fully-slatted floor
  • Single room, solid floor
The models identified some key results with regard to on-farm Salmonella dynamics.
A principal finding showed that there is not a single action that can solve the problem but rather, a number of aspects should be targeted… Continue Reading
 
 Source and Photo: The Pig Site, November 28, 2013
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Researchers Identify Practices to Reduce Contamination Risk

5The Poultry Site – This is going to help make produce safer,” says Laura Strawn, a researcher on the study. “We could significantly reduce risk of contamination through changes that occur a few days before the harvest.”

Many of the risk factors were influenced by when they were applied to fields which suggests that adjustments to current practices may reduce the potential for contamination with minimal cost to growers, says Dr Strawn.

Foodborne illness sickens an estimated 9.4 million, and kills around 1,300 annually in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Produce accounts for nearly half the illnesses, and 23 per cent of the deaths.

“The research is the first to use field collected data to show the association between certain management practices and an increased or decreased likelihood of salmonella and L. monocytogenes,” says Dr Strawn.

For salmonella, manure application within the year prior to the researchers’ sampling boosted the odds of a contaminated field, while the presence of a buffer zone between the fields and potential pathogen reservoirs such as livestock operations or waterways was protective.

Irrigation within three days before sample collection raised the risk of listeria contamination six-fold. Soil cultivation within the week before sampling also increased the chances of contamination.

“These findings will assist growers in evaluating their current on-farm food safety plans (e.g. “Good Agricultural Practices”), implementing preventive controls that reduce the risk of pre-harvest contamination, and making more informed decisions related to field practices prior to harvest,” says Dr Strawn. “Small changes in how produce is grown and managed could result in a large reduction of food safety risks.”

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More Than 300 People Hit by Salmonella from Live Birds

The Poultry Site – A total of 316 persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium have been reported from 37 states, according to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The source of infection has been traced to sales of young poultry from agricultural stores, which are mainly frequented by small-scale and hobby farmers.

According to the latest CDC report – dated 19 August – among 199 ill persons with available information, 51 (26 per cent) have been admitted to hospital; 59 per cent of ill persons are children 10 years of age or younger.

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New Vaccines Target Salmonella and Clostridium in Poultry

1The Poultry Site – Salmonella species are bacteria that can cause foodborne illness in humans when they eat contaminated eggs or other poultry products that are inappropriately cooked. By targeting Salmonella through flock vaccination, contamination of eggs and meat can be reduced without the use of broad scope antibiotics.
 
The poultry industry has been looking for ways to reduce its use of antibiotics due to concerns around the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Since only a very small portion of Salmonella species can cause foodborne illnesses in humans, a vaccine would need to target only these pathogenic species.
 
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Will Changes to Poultry Meat Inspection Improve Global Standards?

34The Poultry Site – In Europe, last year, the European Food Safety Authority published an opinion on the existing inspection procedures in poultry slaughterhouses and came to the conclusion that the simple visual inspection was not sufficient in times when concerns over pathogens such as Salmonella and Campylobacter were rising. The accent it concluded was for a more “whole chain” approach to inspection.

EFSA called for the introduction of a comprehensive food safety assurance system, including clear targets for what should be achieved in poultry carcases and, where appropriate, with respect to a particular hazard for poultry flocks.

The authority also recommended the use of a variety of control options for the main hazards, both on the farm and at the abattoir, in order to meet these targets. >>Continue Reading<<

Source and Photo: The Poultry Site, June 28th, 2013
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Vaccinating Poultry as a Means of Salmonella Control

Professor Paul BarrowThe Poultry Site – Salmonella remains a problem in intensive poultry rearing, in the tropics and in free-range systems, according to Professor Paul Barrow of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science at the University of Nottingham in the UK. Speaking at a seminar entitled ‘Poultry Science Outlook’ organised by the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA) in Bangkok earlier this year, he explained that there is a range of approaches to its control including biosecurity, antibiotics, competitive exclusion, breeding for genetic resistance and vaccination. However, tight biosecurity is difficult to achieve for outdoor systems and competitive exclusion works less well in the field than in the lab…. >>Continue Reading<<

Source and Photo: The Poultry Site, 5th June, 2013
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Campylobacter, E. coli Cases Rise; Salmonella Falls

2The Poultry Site – Campylobacteriosis is the most reported zoonotic disease in humans, with a continuous increase in reported cases over the last five years, according to the annual report on zoonoses and food-borne outbreaks in the European Union.

The trend in reported human cases of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC/STEC) has also been increasing since 2008 and was further strengthened due to the outbreak in the summer of 2011. However, Salmonella cases in humans have continued to fall, marking a decrease for the seventh consecutive year.

The report, which has just been published for 2011, produced jointly by the European Food Safety Authority and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) supports the European Commission and EU Member States in monitoring risks related to zoonotic diseases.

Click here to access the complete article at The Poultry Site
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