Category Archives: Swine disease

Impact of Influenza A on Pork Production

18The Pig Site – Our understanding of the importance of influenza A infection in pig production has evolved rapidly over the past 15 years. Greg Wideman of South West Ontario Veterinary Services explained the impacts of those developments to the 2013 London Swine Conference.
Recent detection of novel subtypes of influenza A, such as H3N2, H1N2 and pandemic H1N1 in swine have heightened our awareness of this pathogen as a primary cause of swine disease and significant zoonotic (from animals to people) and reverse zoonotic (from people to animals) risk.
This paper reviews some ways in which influenza A impacts the pig producer and swine veterinarian…  Continue Reading
 
Source: The Pig Site, November 29, 2013
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Genomics Offers Potential Tool for Limiting Swine Disease

5The Pig Site – “Limiting Disease Through Genetic Selection” was discussed last week as part of Saskatchewan Pork Industry Symposium 2013. Dr John Harding, a professor of veterinary medicine with the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon says on the human side there’s no question genomics is the future and now, with the pig genome being mapped and publicly available, we’ll see the momentum continuing.

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With pig virus looming, are US farms and food supply safe?

8By P.J. Huffstutter of Reuters

MSN News — The sudden and widespread appearance of a swine virus deadly to young pigs – one never before seen in North America – is raising questions about the bio-security shield designed to protect the U.S. food supply.

The swine-only virus, the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus (PEDV), poses no danger to humans or other animals, and the meat from infected pigs is safe for people to eat.

Though previously seen in parts of Asia and Europe, the virus now has spread into five leading hog-raising U.S. states. How it arrived in the United States remains a mystery.

While the U.S. imports millions of pigs each year from Canada, it imports pigs from virtually no other country, and no Canadian cases of PEDV have been confirmed. Veterinarians and epidemiologists say pigs are infected through oral means, and that the virus is not airborne and does it not occur spontaneously in nature.

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Source and Photo: MSN News, 29th May, 2013
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