Vaccinating Poultry as a Means of Salmonella Control

Professor Paul BarrowThe Poultry Site – Salmonella remains a problem in intensive poultry rearing, in the tropics and in free-range systems, according to Professor Paul Barrow of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science at the University of Nottingham in the UK. Speaking at a seminar entitled ‘Poultry Science Outlook’ organised by the World’s Poultry Science Association (WPSA) in Bangkok earlier this year, he explained that there is a range of approaches to its control including biosecurity, antibiotics, competitive exclusion, breeding for genetic resistance and vaccination. However, tight biosecurity is difficult to achieve for outdoor systems and competitive exclusion works less well in the field than in the lab…. >>Continue Reading<<

Source and Photo: The Poultry Site, 5th June, 2013
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4 responses to “Vaccinating Poultry as a Means of Salmonella Control

  1. “What’s so great about vaccinating poultry against Salmonella?” That was the question asked and answered at a special seminar in Thailand recently. Senior editor, Jackie Linden, reports.

  2. “What’s so great about vaccinating poultry against Salmonella?” That was the question asked and answered at a special seminar in Thailand recently. Senior editor, Jackie Linden, reports.

  3. The United Kingdom’s mass poultry vaccinations introduced to combat Salmonella infections have led to a dramatic fall in the number of cases since the late 1990s, according to a researcher at the University of Liverpool.

  4. Between 1981 and 1991, the number of salmonella infections rose by 170% in the UK, driven primarily by an epidemic of Salmonella Enteritidis which peaked in 1993. A raft of control measures were introduced into the poultry industry including movement restrictions, compulsory slaughter and disinfection procedures, as well as a voluntary industry-led vaccination scheme that began in breeding flocks in 1994 and in laying flocks in 1998.

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