Many thriving species at risk from climate change

22By Alister Doyle
MSN News – Many species of birds, amphibians and corals not currently under threat will be at risk from climate change and have been wrongly omitted from conservation planning, an international study said on Wednesday.

The Amazon rainforest was among the places where ever more types of birds and amphibians would be threatened as temperatures climbed, it said. Common corals off Indonesia would also be among the most vulnerable.

Overall, up to 41 percent of all bird species, 29 percent of amphibians and 22 percent of corals were “highly climate change vulnerable but are not currently threatened”, the team of scientists wrote in the journal PLOS ONE.

“It was a surprise,” said Wendy Foden, of the global species program of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) who led the study. Experts had expected far more overlap between species threatened now and those vulnerable to global warming…>>Continue Reading<<

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2 responses to “Many thriving species at risk from climate change

  1. Up to nine percent of all birds, 15% of all amphibians and nine percent of all corals that were found to be highly vulnerable to climate change are already threatened with extinction. These species are threatened by unsustainable logging and agricultural expansion but also need urgent conservation action in the face of climate change, according to the authors. The study’s novel approach looks at the unique biological and ecological characteristics that make species more or less sensitive or adaptable to climate change. Conventional methods have focussed largely on measuring the amount of change to which species are likely to be exposed. IUCN will use the approach and results to ensure The IUCN Red List continues to provide the best possible assessments of extinction risk, including due to climate change.

  2. According to the study’s findings, 24 to 50 percent of bird species, 22 to 44 percent of amphibians and 15 to 32 percent of corals are considered highly susceptible to climate change. The results confirm a 2004 study that stated up to 37 percent of related species were subject to extinction by the year 2050.

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